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Apr 9, 2017

Lappin or Lanvin? Modeling the Embroidered Cotton Voile Shirt!


Readers, I've just completed my embroidered cotton voile shirt, which I made from an early Sixties Butterick pattern.

Check out the entire photo shoot here!

Now please don't confuse this shirt with the Lanvin embroidered cotton voile men's shirt I recently stumbled upon online (below).  It will set you back $750.

Butterick 2305 is a men's shirt pattern that dates from around 1963.  I love the "Italian" collar, which is constructed a lot like a shawl collar.  Why is it called an Italian collar?  I have no idea.  If you know, please share!


I actually picked up two black embroidered cotton voiles.  I'm not sure what I'll do with the second, more ornate one (which you can see just a peek of below).  It would make an amazing dress.  The dotted one I used reminds me of twinkling stars.


And that's it. 

Have you ever made anything from an embroidered fabric?

Have a great day, everybody!

20 comments:

  1. That is a beautiful shirt, and your future in high fashion modeling is again secure.

    Embroidered fabric makes? Not successfully. I had a length of cotton voile embroidered with copper bees. So Beautiful! I picked a really simple pullover blouse pattern (to avoid button choices that would not compliment the bees). I backed the bodice with cotton batiste for modesty, enclosing the seams, and finished too much before I realized I had made it too small for me to get over my head (the seams also made it very stiff). I kept it for the longest time just to admire the beautiful fabric, but keeping failure company does not suit me anymore, and I let it go.
    It was so PRETTY (runs off weeping)

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  2. Love this latest creation. And I adore embroidered fabrics, and textured fabrics in general. While not quite the sort of embroidery you refer to here, I've cross-stitched fabric and then used it for the yoke of a nightie. I'm very pleased with the effect and plan to apply it to future projects.

    Peter, have you ever tried other handcrafts, like embroidery?

    Spud.

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  3. An Italian collar? Maybe men wore it on the Amalfi Coast or some other Italian summer playground. Whatever the reason, it's a great shirt and I really like the collar. Very chic.

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    Replies
    1. That's a good guess. Thanks, Nancy!

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    2. "High school mixed chorus dress" pattern also described that sort of collar as an Italian collar. It looks like what noblemen and women wore in paintings from the beginning and middle of the Renaissance, in the early-mid 1400s. That's my guess for the name.

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    3. Simplicity 5728, from the mid 1970s. Deeper front opening, but the same rise and fall from the back of neck to collar point. It's the wide-open spread exposure of the throat that is Italianate, one supposes. Very operatic.

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    4. I definitely see the resemblance.

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  4. The collar looks like something Marcello Mastroianni would have worn. I just spent ten minutes looking at Google images trying to verify this, but all I could find were photos of him in a suit, or sitting in such a way that I couldn't see the collar on his shirt very well. But nevertheless, it does look very vintage classic European. I like the collar, and I like your shirt.

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  5. Wonderful shirt! And such a nice collar - I would love a pattern for a blouse with a similar collar. Elegant. I sewed an embroidered lawn for a dress, really liked it, but was anxious about the embroidery threads...little breaks, errant threads. Are yours pretty secure or do you chase them a bit?

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    Replies
    1. The individual dots are very secure but there were MANY "errant threads" on the fabric.

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  6. I adore embroidered fabrics and have made the most amazing shelf full of them in my fabric cupboard. So far that's pretty much the extent of my creation with them!

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  7. A Vespa and Cary - suddenly your Roman Holiday is complete (send Michael to the Olive Garden with Ruth Roman, and he can enjoy his version of the same).

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  8. Great shirt Peter. I like your version better than Lanvin's!

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  9. Peter, I didn't see a label on your very elegant shirt. Don't you use them? To answer your question, I am especially fond of eyelet fabrics for blouses, so there is embroidery and holes to deal with. French seams where possible and other cut edge enclosures keep things neat. Luv that collar!

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  10. Peter, I think it might be called a 'cutaway' collar. I found this interesting explanation of men's shirt collars. http://articlesofstyle.com/55368/a-guide-to-shirt-collar-styles/ Who knew that there were so many variations?

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  11. Beautiful shirt. I love it. I have an Italian Sewing Book and they call it an American collar. Like the French call a french seam an American seam

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