Male Pattern Boldness is proud to be the world's most popular men's sewing blog!



About Me



Welcome to Male Pattern Boldness!

My name is Peter Lappin and I'm a native New Yorker, raised in the Bronx and currently living in the Chelsea section of Manhattan (a stone's throw from the Garment District) with my partner, Michael, and our two chihuahuas, Freddy and Willy.



In Spring, 2009, I picked up a pair of used designer jeans at my local Goodwill.  They fit in the waist but the inseam was too long and needed to be shortened.  Unfortunately, to have these jeans hemmed professionally (at a local dry cleaners that does alterations) would have cost more than I'd paid for the jeans themselves.

It occurred to me -- I'm not exactly sure how or why -- that I could pick up an inexpensive sewing machine (back then I had never even touched a sewing machine, let alone known how one works) on Amazon, and perform my own basic alterations.  The machine should pay for itself in no time.

I did extensive online research and stumbled onto some sewing blogs that recommended vintage sewing machines -- 1960's and 70's era Kenmores in particular -- because they were sturdier than modern machines and could tackle just about any sewing job.  I found one on eBay, clicked "Buy it Now," and less than a week later I was teaching myself how to sew.   Almost immediately I realized I could do a lot more with a sewing machine than shorten my pants!



I quickly discovered the online community at Pattern Review (PR).  PR members were tremendously helpful and supportive, recommending sewing books, loaning me instructional videos, and explaining basic sewing techniques like installing a zipper, making a buttonhole, and attaching interfacing.

Over the last six years I've applied myself to sewing with the dedication of a monk.  I have sewn just about every sort of men's and women's garment -- everything from 1920's women's pajamas to classic men's tailored peacoats, from cocktail dresses to jumpsuits.  (Be sure to check out the "Projects" tab to see what I've made.)   To say I love to create clothes is an understatement. In sewing I have found my life's true passion.

The mission of this blog is to share my passion with sewers from all over the world, at every level of experience.

Welcome to Male Pattern Boldness -- look around, put your feet up, and make yourself at home!

34 comments:

  1. Peter where do you get your elastic for the boxershorts? Great site!!

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    Replies
    1. http://www.amazon.com/Stretchrite-4-Inch-25-Yard-White-Elastic/dp/B003W0Y57Y/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1439121662&sr=8-9&keywords=stretchrite+elastic

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  2. Hi There,
    I have Singer Buttonholer (the one in the green box), and wonder.... can be used on a vintage Brother 150?

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    Replies
    1. I'm not familiar with the Brother 150, but if it is a standard short-shank machine (which I suspect it is) and the feed dogs drop (or your have a plate to cover them with), then I suspect the Singer buttonholer will work.

      Hope that helps!

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  3. Hello Peter! I am looking for your contact info and hit you up on your facebook page too. I have some sewing questions and an idea for you!

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    Replies
    1. You can reach me at peterlappinnyc at gmail dot com. Or through my Male Pattern Boldness Facebook page.

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    2. Awesome! Emailing you now. Thank you.

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    3. Peter! Did my email ever come through? Came from Angela Shelton dot com.

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  4. Peter, Creo que tu experiencia es absolutamente reveladora! Yo pensaba que mi nivel de sicosis había alcanzado niveles inmanejables. Pero ahora comprendo que voy por el camino de la gente de bien

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  5. Peter, Somos almas gemelas...........

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  6. Hi Peter, what sewing needles do you recommend for the singer toy sewing machine you featured a video on. I'm looking at purchasing one but it has no needle in it. Thanks,
    Elisabeth.

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    Replies
    1. Hi, Elizabeth. I found this link online. (My toy machine is a Singer 20.)

      http://www.suncatcher-tx.com/shop/Toy-Sewing-Machines--Parts/p/Singer-Toy-Sewing-Machine-Needles-Also-fit-other-toys-sku-1206.htm

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  7. Hello,

    I read on one of your posts that you have two versions of Reader's Digest Complete Guide to Sewing. Is there a certain version that you prefer or recommend?

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    Replies
    1. My 1976 edition has a larger section on tailoring than the 1995 edition. But both are still excellent sewing books.

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  8. As a guy who's interested in learning how to sew, I was wondering what sorts of projects you started out with -- did you start out right away making things that you wanted to wear?

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    Replies
    1. Since I was starting from zero, I made the simplest things I could -- I think my first project was a sewing machine cover -- and very basic men's garments like boxer shorts and caftan tops (no cuffs, no collar). Hope that helps!

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  9. Just wondering about MPB - are all your vintage patterns used? and if they aren't then how to you make a new usuable pattern from a used / cut-up pattern. Any suggestions.

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  10. Hi Peter,
    I work for a large repertory theatre company in Canada. I'm looking to buy a man's summer union suit for one of our productions and I see that you purchased an old one with the intention of making a pattern. Did you make the pattern? Would you be interested in selling a pre-made summer union suit to us, approximately size 40? I can be reached at ecopeman@stratfordfestival.ca Many thanks!

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  11. I recently found a elna 1 at a second hand store here in Stockholm Sweden. I picked it up becuase of the sturdy build and the compact size. After the Google search I found out what a wonderful gem I found for something equal to 20 US dollars. But now I need some help getting it to work. The motor runs like the dream. But the shaft seems have a hard time moving. I was wondering if you and help or point me in the right direction.
    Thanks

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    Replies
    1. You'll want to oil the shaft. Here's a link to a PDF of the manual.

      https://elnagrasshopper.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/elna-grasshopper-instructions-part-one.pdf

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  12. I'm so happy I discovered you. Your video with the vintage singer green box buttonholer persuaded me to get one, and it solved my button hole problem for my first shirt. The buttons did not match any cams for either of my more familiar attachments. Thank you for sharing your passion . It's becoming one of mine too.

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    Replies
    1. So glad you're enjoying the buttonholer, Joe. Thanks for letting me know!

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  13. Hi Peter,

    I have just read about this new item for the men's wardrobe, that ist a big success in France. What do you think about it?
    https://www.calchemise.com/

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    Replies
    1. The link is not to make an advertisment about the item, but I found interessting that it is been present as a "new idea" and I am not sure if really is... wasn't there something like this before at the first-half of the 20th Century?

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    2. Interesting! There was a garment like this, a sort of onesie, but it was meant to be worn underneath clothing. The problem with this is that the underwear part is likely to get dirtier (and wear out faster) than the shirt part. Thanks for sharing it, Andrea!

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    3. And the guys wearing it alone look like they're walking around in their underwear.

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  14. Hi Peter. I enjoy reading your blog and have come to the conclusion that you must be a "sewist" on steroids - in a good sense. You sew for yourself, Michael, your identical cousin, Cathy, your Mom, your dog...and your garments come out soooo beautiful. In addition, I love reading about all the classes you take and your progress throughout. Can you get any better? I think you're already at the top. And speaking of your Mom, while I can't be her identical cousin, perhaps a fraternal cousin. (kidding). Keep up the good work.
    Sharon

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  15. Hi Peter,

    My name is Anuj Agarwal. I'm Founder of Feedspot.

    I would like to personally congratulate you as your blog Male Pattern Boldness has been selected by our panelist as one of the Top 100 Dressmaking Blogs on the web.

    http://blog.feedspot.com/dressmaking_blogs/

    I personally give you a high-five and want to thank you for your contribution to this world. This is the most comprehensive list of Top 100 Dressmaking Blogs on the internet and I’m honored to have you as part of this!

    Also, you have the honor of displaying the badge on your blog.

    Best,
    Anuj

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  16. I was wondering if you have any pattern suggestions for a young man whose 6'4" and wears a size 28x36? I make his dress shirts, but have never made men's pants. At some point I will need to tackle a jacket for him as well. Thanks for your great work.

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    Replies
    1. I suggest you take a standard men's pants pattern and add length to accommodate his height -- the pattern will say where to add the length. If you need to take in the waist, you can do that at the center back seam as well as at the side seams.

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    2. If you want jeans, go with a Kwik Sew men's jeans pattern -- they have excellent instructions. Pants patterns are pretty standard so I can't really recommend one over another. Good luck with it!

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